Hungarian ambassador in Bucharest asked to appear

Viktor Orbán’s March 15 speech and the “Székely Guard’s” founder’s hangig action made it all to much for Bucharest.

The Hungarian ambassador to Romania, Oszkár Füzes was asked to appear in the Romanian ministry of foreign affairs, whom Teodor Baconschi, Romanian minister of foreign affairs asked to: Inform the Romanian authorities about the original text of Orban Viktor’s speech to Hungarians living outside Hungary made on the 15th of March, and to distance himself from the messages attributed to him in the Romanian press.

Youngsters from Miskolc released from Kosice prison

Two middle school children were prosecuted, according to Slovak law the kids may get between six months to three years.

Two days ago three middle school students were arrested by slovak police, after they walked down the streets of Kosice (Hungarian name: Kassa) wearing symbols of autoritarianism on their clothes.

They were taking part on school trip.  One of them was realeased the same day, while the two other today from police custody, said the eastern-Slovak police spokesperson to Hungarian MTI.

One of the students was released after the police found his clothes to be in order after all, the two other young men where interegated, and they where released later on, with an investigation started against them, with allegations of supporting and promoting organizations oppressing fundamental human rights.
According to slovak rules, the boys may face prison senteces ranging from sixm months to three years.

Budapest airport renamed after composer Liszt

Budapest, March 16 (MTI) – Parliament voted to rename Budapest’s international Ferihegy airport to Budapest Ferenc Liszt International Airport on Wednesday evening.

The initiative to rename the airport after the composer and pianist 200 years after his birth was contained in a Fidesz-sponsored energy bill.

The decision was made with 231 votes for and 71 against

Source: mti.hu

Media authority head defends Hungary media law

Budapest, March 16 (MTI) – Hungary’s new media law conforms to European Union guidelines, head of the National Media and Infocommunications Authority (NMHH) Annamaria Szalai told a conference organised by the association of Electronic Electronic Press Association in Budapest on Wednesday

Szalai, who is also president of NMHH’s Media Council, said the concept of the law was “clear” — to provide an up-to-date legal framework for the growing convergence between media providers and news networks, to renew the country’s “uncontrollable and chaotic” public-service media and introduce the Public Service Code which creates broadcasting standards.

A new supervisory body comprising representatives of organisations enjoying broad public support will enforce the new code, she said.

Szalai said controls over printed and electronic media content were confined to stipulating respect for human dignity, the country’s constitutional order, and privacy, while banning hate speech and protecting minors.

Concerning the rights of journalists, the new law lifts an earlier obligation for them to disclose certain pieces of information in a court procedure, Szalai said.

She said the compulsory registration of media outlets is merely “an administrative element” of the law, and the data is needed for legal reasons.

On the subject of the law’s much-criticised provisions concerning possible sanctions against media providers, Szalai said that the goal was “prevention rather than punishment” and that the courts would apply the principles of “gradualness, equal treatment and proportionate penalties” for broadcasters. She rejected worries raised earlier that the penalties could drive outlets bankrupt.

Source: mti.hu


English

Media authority head defends Hungary media law

Print

Wednesday March 16 2011

Budapest, March 16 (MTI) – Hungary’s new media law conforms to European Union guidelines, head of the National Media and Infocommunications Authority (NMHH) Annamaria Szalai told a conference organised by the association of Electronic Electronic Press Association in Budapest on Wednesday.

Szalai, who is also president of NMHH’s Media Council, said the concept of the law was “clear” — to provide an up-to-date legal framework for the growing convergence between media providers and news networks, to renew the country’s “uncontrollable and chaotic” public-service media and introduce the Public Service Code which creates broadcasting standards.

A new supervisory body comprising representatives of organisations enjoying broad public support will enforce the new code, she said.

Szalai said controls over printed and electronic media content were confined to stipulating respect for human dignity, the country’s constitutional order, and privacy, while banning hate speech and protecting minors.

Concerning the rights of journalists, the new law lifts an earlier obligation for them to disclose certain pieces of information in a court procedure, Szalai said.

She said the compulsory registration of media outlets is merely “an administrative element” of the law, and the data is needed for legal reasons.

On the subject of the law’s much-criticised provisions concerning possible sanctions against media providers, Szalai said that the goal was “prevention rather than punishment” and that the courts would apply the principles of “gradualness, equal treatment and proportionate penalties” for broadcasters. She rejected worries raised earlier that the penalties could drive outlets bankrupt.

Second Budapest restaurant gets Michelin star

Budapest, March 16 (MTI) – A second restaurant in Budapest, Onyx in central Vorosmarty Square, has received a Michelin star, Bloomberg reported on Wednesday

The 2011 European Michelin Guide rates 1,771 restaurants and 1,557 hotels. According to the latest list, Europe currently has 15 three-star restaurants, 58 two-star restaurants and 284 one-star restaurants. Of the latter, 39 made it to the list for the first time this year.

The first restaurant to get a Michelin star in Budapest was Costes, which won its star last year.

Source: mti.hu